Arthur Howard

The following obituary by Sue Miller first appeared in the December 2002 issue of the Orwell Bulletin

Photo:Mr Howard in his Bakery

Mr Howard in his Bakery

Arthur died in October in Addenbrooke’s Hospital shortly before his 92nd birthday.  In 1991 the late Gordon Lines, then editor of the Bulletin, wrote of him “he may not have been born here, but with his outstanding service to the community as a whole, Arthur can claim to be a true Orwellian.”

Arthur was born in Lincolnshire, but came to our area in 1930 when he was employed as a baker at Bourn. In 1942 he took over Walter Pearmain's bakery in Orwell High Street, opening an off-licence there as well as baking bread, and also ran the Post Office at the general stores in Town Green Road, opposite what is now Lordship Community Room. Arthur ran all three businesses until his retirement in 1977, but still found time to organise forty annual St. Andrew’s church fetes and to serve on the parish council for 25 years, six of them as chairman.

Photo:From the left J.J Brown, C.D Bullen, S.J Wisson, A.H Miller, H.G Peters, B. Hawkins A. Howard, and C.Arnold receiving the Fairhaven Trophy 1961

From the left J.J Brown, C.D Bullen, S.J Wisson, A.H Miller, H.G Peters, B. Hawkins A. Howard, and C.Arnold receiving the Fairhaven Trophy 1961

He was also a founder of Orwell Horticultural society and a governor of Orwell’s Church of England primary school for 40 year. In that capacity he took a keen interest in the planning and building of its new premises at Petersfield School in 1961.

In retirement Arthur served behind the post office counter in our village store and worked as a volunteer at Wimpole Hall. The deaths of his wife and daughter brought him great sadness, but he maintained an independent and well organised life in his Town Green Road bungalow until a few years ago when he moved into a flatlet at Southwell Court, Melbourn. Arthur was always pleased to welcome Orwell friends for a chat and often declared that ‘if you are in trouble and need a helping hand, Orwell is the place to be’. He will be fondly remembered here whenever people talk of years gone by.

See also Memories of an Orwell Baker.

 

This page was added by Pat Grigor on 21/11/2012.

If you're already a registered user of this site, please login using the form on the left-hand side of this page.