Town Green Farmhouse

By David Miller

This farm once had an extensive range of barns and buildings. One of the photos below shows the base of a barn at the time of its demolition and at the same time reveals the side view of the two buildings which form the major part of the Farmhouse itself. It is easier to recognise, however, from the front.

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page

In addition to the two parts of the building shown in the thumbnails above, there is a further part of the house to the left of the front door as one faces the house from the street. This is of uncertain provenance, since it is a different form of construction from the house proper, and it could possibly have started off life as a barn. It is even possible that this part of the house was built (as a barn) before the rest of the house was added on to the side of it. It might represent the first steps in the occupation for private living purposes of what was originally the communal Town Green, which probably once extended out to the back road.

In 1686, the farm belonged to John Godfrey. (see 1686 Map.) 

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page
The Hearth Tax returns of 1660 and 1662 show that John Godfrey was taxable on four hearths, whereas one would normally expect to find no more than two hearths in the two buildings mentioned above. It seems therefore that the barn like structure was by then a part of the Farmhouse, and with its own hearths, although there may have been a blacksmith's hearth in one of the other farm buildings.

The Farm is Listed Grade II. Internally, it is of great interest. The supposed barn building has very substantial arched tie beams in the roof, which could date back to before 1600.

Photo:Arched tie beam.

Arched tie beam.

Photo:Pegged dovetail collar beam joint, as sound as the day it was made. The clasped purlin joint has not been so successful!

Pegged dovetail collar beam joint, as sound as the day it was made. The clasped purlin joint has not been so successful!

In the main part of the house, the roof structure is also impressive, with braced purlin construction. The other photos of the interior (by kind permission of the owner) speak for themselves.  The wall painting is recent, but is entirely in keeping with the old tradition of decorative painting on the walls.

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page

Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page
Photo: Illustrative image for the 'Town Green Farmhouse' page

This page was added by Sue Miller on 14/02/2013.

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